Wild Recipes

Smoked Duck with Apple Maple Mop

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If you have read any of my previous recipes then you know by now that I love all things barbeque. The smell of smoky food is infectious, and the flavor is intoxicating. Barbeque has been one of my favorite foods since I was a kid and I have spent many hours, or dare I say days, trying to perfect my craft.

During the hustle of a regular workweek, I prefer to use simple and/or passive recipes that I can set and forget. Other than mopping your meat every half hour, this recipe allows you to focus on whatever other tasks you need to accomplish and have an easy and delicious meal ready at the end of the day. The best part of this recipe is that it allows you to use the whole duck without spending much time parting it out and using different recipes on the different body parts.

This recipe is based on a pork rib recipe that I have modified and experimented with over the last several years. Smoking the meat provides flavor enough but mopping smoked meat is a great way to keep the meat moist and inject even more flavor.

Serving Size: 3
Time to Make: 2.5 Hours (plus 24-hour brine)
Also Works With: Pork Ribs (See above)


Looking for more duck recipes? Try out this Duck and Lemon Soup with Orzo!


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Smoked Duck with Apple Maple Mop

0 from 0 votes
Recipe by Quincy Milton Course: Wild RecipesCuisine: American
Servings

3

servings
Prep time

30

minutes
Cooking time

2

hours 

This recipe is based on a pork rib recipe that I have modified and experimented with over the last several years. Smoking the meat provides flavor enough but mopping smoked meat is a great way to keep the meat moist and inject even more flavor.

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Ingredients

  • For the Duck
  • Salt

  • Pepper

  • Garlic Powder

  • Paprika

  • Poultry Seasoning

  • For the Mop
  • 1/2 cup apple juice

  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup

  • 1 teaspoon brown sugar

  • Sides
  • Classic barbeque sides such as cornbread, coleslaw, and vegetables

Preparation

  • Many people swear by brining ducks, however, when it comes to dabbling ducks, I generally enjoy their flavor as-is. When I do brine meat I tend to use as little salt as possible and primarily use the brine to enhance flavor. Should you choose to brine your duck, pluck and gut the bird and remove the wings and feet. Add the whole bird to a resealable Ziploc bag and add 1 tablespoon of salt and sugar. Cover the bird with water and season the brine with thyme, bay leaves, or rosemary. Add chicken stock to the brine for extra flavor. Place the bag in the refrigerator for 18-24 hours before use.
  • Remove the bird and pat dry 10-15 minutes before you plan to start cooking. Spatchcock the bird by removing the backbone and flattening the bird. You may have to break the bones around the shoulders/wings to ensure the bird is flat. Once the bird is flat, place it breast side up and season with the salt, pepper, garlic powder, paprika, and poultry seasoning to taste. A good rule of thumb with paprika is to coat the bird until there is a distinct red coating. There is no need to double coat with paprika.
  • Preheat your smoker to 205°F and place the bird breast side up on the smoker. Mix the apple juice, brown sugar, and maple syrup in a small container. Using a mop utensil or brush, coat the bird with the mixture.
  • Set a timer for 1.5 to 2 hours and mop the bird every 20 to 30 minutes. Once the bird has reached an internal temperature of 120 degrees, increase the temperature of your smoker or start your grill to 350 degrees. Place the bird breast side down and cook until it has reached an internal temperature of approximately 140 degrees at the thickest point of the breast (usually around 10 minutes).
  • Remove the bird once it has reached the desired internal temperature and allow it to rest for five minutes before serving. To serve, simply slice meat off the bone. However, the legs can be eaten whole as you would a regular chicken leg. Serve the bird up with your sides and enjoy!

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Quincy Milton

Quincy is an avid fly fisherman and bird hunter who approaches outdoor activities from the perspective of an outdoor scientist. He loves experimenting with wild game recipes, especially when it involves a smoker.

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