Articles

Hunting

  • Trophies and Why We Hunt
    Everyone has their own reasons why they hunt. A person’s decision to go afield is a very personal one and if you surveyed 100 hunters on why they hunt, you’d get at least 120 answers. But we try to put ourselves into neat little boxes at the expense of others. Read any post about hunting in Africa and the “I’m a hunter but” comments won’t take long to find. Big game hunting with dogs is another huge divider amongst us and the anti-hunters know it. Just look at the most recent bills around the country trying to ban predator hunting and the use of dogs.
  • Harvesting Nature Magazine is Live!
    inaugural issue of our electronic and print-on-demand magazine! We want to celebrate spring with delicious wild recipes and awesome adventure stories. This issue covers bird hunting, fly fishing, American shad, pheasant pasta, Florida turkey hunting, spring bear basics, foraging tips, and so much more!
  • Opening Day on the Prairie
    After a fairly productive morning of hunting northern bobwhites somewhere in central Kansas, the dogs and I returned to my pickup truck to rest for a while. It was still early in the day and I could already tell it was going to be an unseasonably warm day for November. I stripped off a few layers and put away my shotgun as the dogs enjoyed a well-deserved dip in a water trough. All three dogs, Ranger, Ruby, and Pearl had exceeded my expectations on their first hunt together. Each one did their fair share of pointing, backing, and retrieving. I wish I could say this quality had persisted for the duration of the season.
  • One at a Time
    Every year, I do my best to take an extended bird hunting road trip through a few western states. I enjoy exploring new places and hunting the birds that inhabit them. Besides, as the English poet William Cowper said, “(v)ariety’s the very spice of life”. And, in my opinion, being exposed to a broad array of conditions make the dogs and me better hunters. This December the first leg of the trip took us to the southwestern corner of Oregon in search of mountain quail (Oreortyx pictus), the largest species of quail in the United States and the only one I had not had the opportunity to hunt.
  • The Quest for Columbia River Chukar
    I knelt on the edge of the precipice with my knee dug into a sandy spot beneath a massive aromatic sagebrush while Finn ravenously lapped water from a small, green collapsible bowl. Behind and below us, the Columbia River wound lazily between lush, orderly, emerald orchards, rock faces, and scree slopes – a peaceful and extravagant scene. My friend Chas stood slightly downhill to my left with his upland vest in hand, packing away a massive wild chukar that he had come to harvest with a combination of Finn’s good work and a peck on the cheek from Lady Luck.

Fishing

  • Harvesting Nature Magazine is Live!
    inaugural issue of our electronic and print-on-demand magazine! We want to celebrate spring with delicious wild recipes and awesome adventure stories. This issue covers bird hunting, fly fishing, American shad, pheasant pasta, Florida turkey hunting, spring bear basics, foraging tips, and so much more!
  • 12 Holiday Gifts for Every Hunter, Angler and Forager
    Order your favorite hunter or angler the one gift that will change their seasons forever. We put together this awesome gift guide. All of these products have been field tested and have changed the way we hunted, fished, foraged or cooked over the past year. 
  • Looking Back on Summer Fly Fishing
    8:45 PM. The pond is the color of fresh cantaloupe, with crimson neon-edged clouds low in the western sky. The light is fading, but it’s as if the sun were captured in the water, its surface glowing like last night’s embers. The smell of fireworks hangs in the air, and a blue haze wafts lazily over the black treetops. As it darkens, the blooming bursts of fireworks can be seen through the wooded county properties, accompanied by enthusiastic hollers. I pull on my boots, grab my 6-weight fly rod, and hoof it as fast as I can to everyone’s favorite brushy corner spot. I tie on a tiny brown dry fly, mimicking the flying insects hovering around my face, reading the water with my eyes and hands. Amidst the tall reeds and slimy rocks, I roll cast next to a stump sticking out of the water, letting the fly drift lazily in the current, and a bluegill hits it like shotgun recoil. I admire its metallic rainbow colors, fine size, and dense little tank of a body. When I release it into the brown, mucky shallows, it takes off with a splash of the tail that sprays me in the face with water – such attitude!
  • Chasing Cats
    While I had a conventional introduction to hunting and fishing in my younger years, it wasn’t until the last three or four years that my interest, involvement, and identification with hunting really took shape. I’ve also begun to learn that this relationship with the outdoors will likely always be evolving and adapting and that an individual’s hunting or fishing “ethos” is perhaps one of the most personal things; built and shaped by one’s experiences, mixed with opinions and localized social norms, and perhaps more contentious than even politics.
  • Three Keys to Mountain Stream Trout
    Stepping into a reach I had never laid eyes on, water spilled across the floodplain through newly cut side channels, occupied new backwaters, and spilled through massive apex log jams. Beautiful pools formed below the jams and behind precisely placed root wads. Riffles spilled across cobble bars parallel to the head of the pool, forming textbook dry-fly dead-drifting waters, irresistible to inhabiting trout.

News

  • Florida Opens Goliath Grouper Season
    On 3 March 2022, at a public meeting in Tampa, the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission voted to institute a goliath grouper season. This will be the first time the giant fish will be allowed to be harvested in the United States since 1990.
  • Federal Agencies are Planning for the Infrastructure Bill
    In August 2021, the House of Representatives passed the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (H.R. 3684), also known as the “Infrastructure Bill”. While the $1.2 trillion dollar bill is geared toward improving roads, bridges, airports and ports, broadband internet, and water and energy systems across the nation, it also contains around $20 billion aimed at natural resources management, enhancement, education, and protection.
  • Harvesting Nature Magazine is Live!
    inaugural issue of our electronic and print-on-demand magazine! We want to celebrate spring with delicious wild recipes and awesome adventure stories. This issue covers bird hunting, fly fishing, American shad, pheasant pasta, Florida turkey hunting, spring bear basics, foraging tips, and so much more!
  • One Month Left for Comment on FERC’s Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Removal of the Lower Klamath Dams
    It seems like fish and fisherman have taken a back seat to other interests for far too long but recently this group scored a major victory in the Klamath River Dam Removal project. Despite over a century of anthropogenic impacts including timber harvest, dams, and water development, the Klamath River still maintains an interesting array of fisheries along with copious opportunities to pursue them. However, with the removal of the dams the hope is that this river will be super charged with fish and the fishing community is eagerly paying attention.
  • Cases of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus Type 2 on the Rise
    It seems these days there are so many things jockeying for our attention, the increasing prevalence of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), the global pandemic, and now the invasion of Ukraine. With such large and looming happenings in the forefront, the rapid spread of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease (RHDV2) affecting wild populations has mostly flown under the radar, but in December of 2021, there was a new detection of RHDV2 in a wild jackrabbit in California, in San Benito County, the first since August (CDFA 2021).

0
    0
    Your Cart
    Your cart is emptyReturn to Shop