Venison Steak and Mushroom Miso Ramen

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This hearty and delicious soup was inspired by Japanese miso ramen, one of the three types of basic ramen soup in Japan.

I made my version by adding white miso paste (available in most large grocery stores these days) to venison bone broth along with aromatics, and water used to reconstitute dried shiitake mushrooms. Dried mushrooms and their soaking liquid add something special to the dish but if you can’t find them feel free to use fresh, though you’ll have to sauté them first. I must say, the flavour of rich meaty venison broth mixing with the freshly seared venison steak was phenomenal and a nice change from the more common braised meat you find in soups.

Have fun with the garnishes. You’ll definitely want a jammy egg in there, but customize the rest of your ramen by adding any or all of the garnishes I’ve suggested, or you can come up with some of your own!

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Venison Steak and Mushroom Miso Ramen

Recipe by Adam BerkelmansCourse: Wild Recipes
Servings

4

servings
Prep time

30

minutes
Cooking time

40

minutes

Ingredients

  • For the Soup
  • 1 lb venison loin steaks

  • Kosher salt

  • Freshly ground black pepper

  • 6 dried shiitake mushrooms

  • 5 cups venison broth

  • 1 tablespoon mirin (or 1 tbsp rice vinegar + 2 tsp sugar)

  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil

  • 4 tablespoons white miso paste

  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce

  • 2 cloves garlic, minced

  • ½ tablespoon ginger, minced

  • 2 large eggs

  • 1 tablespoon fat or oil

  • 1 lb fresh ramen noodles or 3 pucks of dried

  • For the Garnishes (use any or all of the below)
  • Vegetables cut into matchsticks – carrot, daikon, radish, cabbage, beets

  • Bok choy or any Asian greens

  • Enoki or Shimeji mushrooms

  • Scallions, sliced thinly

  • Fresh herbs like cilantro, dill, parsley, or basil

  • Red or green chilies, sliced thinly

  • Sesame seeds

  • Chili oil

  • Tahini

  • Shichimi toragashi or other crushed chili pepper

Preparation

  • Season venison steaks liberally with salt and pepper on all sides. Set aside.
  • Put dried shiitakes in a bowl. Pour 1 cup of very hot water over them and let them reconstitute for 15 minutes, while you prep the garnishes. Once soft, take out the mushrooms (reserving the water) and slice them.
  • Add the venison broth, mirin, sesame oil, miso paste, soy sauce, garlic, and ginger to a medium pot. Add the sliced mushrooms and pour in the mushroom soaking liquid, withholding any sediment from the bottom of the bowl. Stir everything to combine, then bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and let cook for 15 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, bring a large pot of water to a boil. Gently add the eggs and boil for exactly 7 minutes. Immediately remove the eggs and run under cold water until cool. Gently crack the eggs and peel. Slice them in half.
  • If using boy choy as a garnish, add it to the boiling water for 1 minute, then remove and run under cold water until cool. Let the water stay on a simmer while you prepare the steaks.
  • Add 1 tablespoon of fat or oil to a cast iron or steel pan over medium high heat. Add the venison steaks, searing both sides until the interior is cooked to your desired doneness. I prefer medium rare, or 135°F. Set aside to rest for 10 minutes. Slice into bite sized pieces.
  • Bring the pot of water back to the boil and add a generous amount of salt. Add the ramen noodles and cook as per the package’s suggestion. Split the hot noodles in between four bowls.
  • Ladle the hot broth over the noodles, leaving lots of room for garnishes.
  • Garnish each bowl with half an egg, ¼ of the sliced venison steak, and an assortment of garnishes.
  • Serve immediately. Enjoy!

Adam Berkelmans

Adam Berkelmans, also known as The Intrepid Eater, is a passionate ambassador for real food and a proponent of nose to tail eating. He spends his time between Ottawa and a cozy lake house north of Kingston, Ontario. When not cooking, he can be found hunting, fishing, foraging, gardening, reading, traveling, and discovering new ways to find and eat food.

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