Summery Noodle Salad with Canada Goose

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Goose often gets relegated to autumnal meals, full of heavy sauces and rich flavours, but it can also shine in a light, summery meal like this one. This is also a great way to help clear your freezer of last year’s goose in preparation of this year’s hunting season. Use whatever vegetables you have that are at their peak of ripeness; this time of year it is tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, zucchini, and basil. You can find packages of dried ramen noodles at any Asian grocer or many large grocery chains, but if you can’t seem to find them, just use the packages of instant ramen soup available everywhere. Simply set aside or discard the seasoning packet (try it on popcorn!) and use the noodles for the salad. This meal is best enjoyed eaten outside in the sun!

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Summery Noodle Salad with Canada Goose

Recipe by Adam BerkelmansCourse: Wild Recipes
Servings

4

servings
Prep time

45

minutes
Cooking time

40

minutes

Ingredients

  • For the Salad
  • large Canada goose breast (skin on), or 2 small

  • Kosher salt and black pepper

  • cob of sweet corn, shucked, or ¾ cup of corn kernels

  • red bell pepper

  • yellow bell pepper

  • small zucchini

  • cucumber

  • red onion, thinly sliced

  • big handful cherry tomatoes (multi-coloured if possible), sliced in half

  • green onions, sliced

  • pucks of dried ramen noodles (you can even use the instant soup ones and just toss the seasoning packet)

  • tablespoon vegetable oil

  • bunch fresh basil, torn into bite-size pieces

  • For the Dressing
  • limes

  • tablespoons olive oil

  • clove garlic, minced

  • tablespoon white sugar

  • 8 teaspoon kosher salt

  • Lots of freshly cracked black pepper

Preparation

  • If possible, coat the goose breast with a generous pinch of salt and lots of black pepper, and leave it covered in the fridge overnight or for several hours. If you didn’t manage to do this, use a less generous pinch of salt right before cooking.
  • Bring a medium pot of water to the boil and drop in the cob of corn. Cook for 5 minutes, then remove. Don’t dump the water as you can use it for the noodles later.
  • While the corn cools, slice the peppers, zucchini, and cucumber into matchsticks, or what is known as a julienne.
  • Transfer the cut vegetables to a large salad bowl. Add the red onion, tomatoes, and green onions.
  • Cut the kernels off of the cob of corn and add them to the salad bowl.
  • Bring the water back to the boil and add the ramen noodles. Cook as per package directions or until soft. Once done, run them under cold water to stop them from cooking. Drain well, then add them to the salad bowl.
  • In a cast iron or stainless-steel pan, heat up the vegetable oil over high heat. Add the goose breast, skin side down, and cook for 2-4 minutes, or until you’ve developed a nice golden crust. Flip the breast over and cook for 1 minute, then lower the heat to medium and cook until the internal temperature reaches 135°F. Timing will all depend on the size of the breast, so you should rely on a good temperature gauge rather than times given in recipes!
  • Take the goose breast out of the pan and let it rest.
  • While it is resting, make the dressing. Squeeze the juice of both limes into a small bowl. Add the rest of the ingredients and whip with a fork until emulsified.
  • Slice the goose breast as thinly as possible, then add it and any juices that have accumulated to the salad bowl. Add the dressing and the torn basil leaves, then toss VERY well. It may be easier to just get in there with very clean hands and toss it like that. The lime juice will “cook” the surface of the goose breast, causing it to look over-done, but it will still be tender and juicy.
  • Serve piled onto plates or in bowls for a perfect summer meal. Enjoy!

Adam Berkelmans

Adam Berkelmans, also known as The Intrepid Eater, is a passionate ambassador for real food and a proponent of nose to tail eating. He spends his time between Ottawa and a cozy lake house north of Kingston, Ontario. When not cooking, he can be found hunting, fishing, foraging, gardening, reading, traveling, and discovering new ways to find and eat food.

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