Venison Carpaccio Crostini

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Looking for a unique and adventurous way to introduce your family and friends to the world of wild game? For a special occasion or a Sunday night dinner to remember, you can’t go wrong with this one!

Serving Size      Time To Make

  4-6                  2 Hours

Special Equipment 

Extremely sharp kitchen knife

Baking Sheet

Alternate Cuts That Work

Back-Strap of Sheep, Goat, any Cervid

Ingredients

  • Marinated Artichokes
  • Marinated Cherry Peppers
  • Marinated Roasted Peppers
  • Marinated Roasted Garlic
  • Capers
  • Prosciutto
  • Fresh Tomatoes
  • Fresh Basil 
  • Fresh Parsley
  • Fresh Kale
  • Ricotta Cheese
  • Pecorino Romano
  • Fresh Mozzarella 
  • Polenta (Coarse Ground Corn Meal)
  • Venison Back Strap
  • Red Wine
  • Pork Lard


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Preparation 

Start by making the polenta. Bring 4 cups of salted water to a boil then whisk in 1 cup of course ground corn meal. Continue to cook and stir over low heat for 30 minutes until the corn meal mixture is creamy. Now spread your polenta across a baking sheet 1/4’’ inch thick and let cool in your refrigerator for 1 hour until it has set up. Once cooled, cut into brick size pieces roughly 2’’X 8’’. 

Prepare your antipasto station. On a large serving tray or cutting board, lay out all of you antipasto and fresh ingredients. Make little piles of each marinated ingredient. Cut the fresh ingredients into topping sized portions and prep your cheese. I used a vegetable peeler to get paper thin shavings of the Pecorino Romano cheese, made 1/8’’ slabs of the fresh mozzarella, and filled a ziplock with ricotta to be used as a piping bag. Once all ingredients are prepped, cover with plastic wrap and place in the fridge until you are ready to assemble your crostini. 

Prep your back-strap by removing all silver skin and coating it in course sea salt and black pepper. Place your back-strap on an extremely hot greased cast iron pan or griddle touching each side of the back-strap to the pan. Your are not cooking but cauterizing the exterior of the meat. Immediately remove from the pan, let rest, and then place in the refrigerator. 

Now, let’s turn that polenta into polenta crostini. In the same pan or griddle, add more grease and sear the polenta bricks until golden brown and crispy on both sides. Remove from heat and place on a cooling rack. 

While your polenta is cooling, slice your cooled back-strap into 1/16’’ to 1/8’’ strips across the grain of the meat leaving the outside edge of the salt and pepper crust intact. Now slice your polenta crostini to match the size of the back-strap slices.

With all of the ingredients prepped it is time to assemble your venison carpaccio crostini. Using your polenta crostini as a base, add different combinations of the ingredients to make your own perfect bites. This is a fun dish that’s also an activity that allows your friends and family the ability to interact, customize each piece, and try a little bit of everything.

A note on raw venison

You will never find any government documents or safe food practices that will condone the consumption of raw meat. Eating raw meat comes with risks and can cause illness. You should never eat raw or rare meat from any animal that feeds on carrion. Examples include bear, coyote, cougar, wild boar, etc. These animals can carry a slew of diseases and parasites including trichinosis. When deciding wether or not it is safe to eat raw or extremely rare meat ,you must ask yourself what you know about the meat you are going to consume and how it was handled from the field. 

Dan Renna

Dan lives his life with his wife on a small homestead in Western MA where he raises livestock, hunts, and farms to fill their pantries and freezer. He balances family, work, and life, but also maintains the connection to his food and its origins.

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