Wild Game Stock: Keep Those Bones

Soup Pot

Hunting Season has officially opened in most places and it is time so start planning out what you will do with the mounds and mounds of game meat that you will harvest. Only kidding about the mounds and mounds, but it is important to consider what you will be doing with the prime cuts and the other bits. I personally try to save as much of the bones from animals and fish as I can. Why? To make the most delicious stocks, of course.

A solid stock is the quintessential ingredient to any soup, stew, rice, pasta, or even a chili dish. In its very basic form, you boil down the bones from fish or animals with some spices and vegetables. This creates a much more flavorful base for your dishes. Depending on your level of culinary skill, stocks can also be used to make sauces to put atop dishes as well.

I would like to share three stock or consommé recipes which are slightly modified versions taken from Escoffier’s Guide to Modern Cookery. This publication was first published 1903 and still serves as the foundation of the culinary world for both restaurants and culinary schools alike.

With this said, think first before tossing out those bones this hunting season. Instead, take a little time to create a flavorful stock and get the most out of your animals. Remember, using as much as you can is part of respecting the animal’s life. I also recommend buying some mason jars to store your stock so you can keep it on hand.

Chicken Stock

Game Stock (Consommé for Clear Soups)

Yield: 4 quarts

Ingredients:

3 lbs of bones (venison, elk, bear, moose, etc)

2 sticks of celery, chopped

1 medium leek, chopped

1 lbs of rabbit trimming

Bones of 1 pheasant or 2 quail/dove

6 sprigs of thyme

2 bay leaves

1 tsp of cloves

1 cup of sliced carrots, browned in 1 tbsp of butter

1 onion browned in the oven

2 sticks of butter

1 lbs of mushrooms, browned in 2 tbsp of butter

6 quarts of water (1/2 quart will be reserved for the end)

2 tbsp of salt and 10 peppercorns to be added 10 minutes prior to straining

Preparation:

  1. Preheat your oven to 450 degrees
  2. Brown all your bones for 15-20 minutes
  3. Drain the grease from the bones
  4. Add the bones to a large stock pot
  5. Place the pot over a medium-high flame
  6. Add the water, celery, leeks, thyme, bay leaves, cloves, carrots, onion, butter, and mushrooms
  7. Bring the stock to a boil
  8. Reduce heat to medium low and allow to simmer for 4 hours, stirring occasionally and skimming the surface for any matter that collects
  9. Remove from heat
  10. Add the salt, pepper corns, and ½ quart of cold water
  11. Allow to rest for 10 minutes
  12. Skim the surface of all matter
  13. Strain the stock
  14. Place in jars and allow to cool before storing

Wild Poultry Stock

Yield: 4 quarts

Ingredients:

12 lbs of pheasant, dove, quail, turkey bones, or a combination of them all

1 lbs leek, chopped

1 stick celery, chopped

1 lbs parsnips, chopped

1 medium sized onion with a clove stuck in it

1 lbs carrots, chopped

5 quarts water (1/2 quart reserved for the end)

1 tbsp of salt

Preparation:

  1. Preheat your oven to 450 degrees
  2. Brown all your bones for 15-2- minutes
  3. Drain the grease form the bones
  4. Add the bones to a large stock pot
  5. Place the pot over a medium-high flame
  6. Add the water, celery, leeks, parsnips, onion, carrots, and salt
  7. Bring the stock to a boil
  8. Reduce heat to medium low and allow to simmer for 4 hours, stirring occasionally and skimming the surface for any matter that collects
  9. Remove from heat
  10. Add the ½ quart of cold water
  11. Allow to rest for 10 minutes
  12. Skim the surface of all matter
  13. Strain the stock
  14. Place in jars and allow to cool before storing

Wild Fish Stock

Yield: 4 quarts

Ingredients:

4 lbs of trimmings or bones from fish

¼ cup chopped parsley

1 bottle of white wine

1 lbs of blanched white onions

1 stick of butter

1 lemon

4 quarts of cold water

Preparation:

  1. Bring a large stock pot to medium heat
  2. Place the butter in the bottom of a large stock pot
  3. Add the blanched onions and the parsley
  4. Place the fish remnants on top of the parsley and onions
  5. Squeeze the juice out of the lemon on top of the fish
  6. Cover and allow to cook for 10 minutes, jerking the pot occasionally
  7. Add the white wine and allow the mixture to reduce by half (approximately 15-25 minutes)
  8. Add the water, raise the heat to medium high, and bring to a boil
  9. Allow the stock to cook for 5 minutes then skim the top
  10. Reduce the heat to medium-low and allow to cook for 15 minutes
  11. Skim again and allow to cool
  12. Place and jars and cool completely before storing

3 thoughts on “Wild Game Stock: Keep Those Bones

  • Pingback: Rabbit and Antelope Andouille Gumbo | Harvesting Nature

  • December 2, 2015 at 10:38 am
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    How do you store it and the jars? In the refrigerator I assume?
    Also, is it good practice to cut the bones in half first to make sure you get the collagen, etc?

    Reply
    • December 2, 2015 at 12:15 pm
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      I typically store in the freezer. Just make sure you leave enough room for the stock to expand when frozen. You can also cut the bones to get some extra flavors.

      Reply

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